Blog

How to treat corneal ulcers and abrasions with collagen corneal shields

By Vanessa Poulin - Innovative Veterinary Care Journal

VET SHIELDTM is a pain-free way to support the healing of corneal ulcers and abrasions in your veterinary practice.

Comprised primarily of water and collagen, the cornea is the clear outer layer of the eye which plays an essential role in vision and eye health. The cornea focuses light into the eye so you can see clearly and also acts as a protective outer layer against debris and germs. But what happens when it gets damaged? If the cornea becomes damaged through injury or infection, the resulting scaring or discoloration can can lead to vision loss. Research has found that the use of collagen can promote epithelial and stromal healing within pets. Quick healing of the corneal surface is ideal for the comfort of the patient as well as for the prevention of infection and scaring.

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Proper ocular hygiene for dogs prone to tear stains

By Vanessa Poulin - Innovative Veterinary Care Journal

Improve the health and comfort of canine patients prone to tear stains by talking to their owners about proper ocular hygiene.

Tear stains in dogs are caused by a chemical called porphyrin. These iron-containing molecules – excreted through the intestinal tract, bile ducts, saliva, urine, and tears – can cause red-brown stains on the dog’s fur, most noticeably around the eyes on light-colored dogs. Excessive tearing can be caused by numerous factors including dry eye, certain medications, conjunctivitis, glaucoma, eye infections, allergies, ingrown eyelashes, poor diet, and environmental factors. Brachycephalic breeds are predisposed to tear staining, since their flatter noses can affect their tear ducts by making them narrower or crooked, which can lead to an overflow of tears onto the fur.

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Tear production and good ocular hygiene in dogs and cats

By Vanessa Poulin - Innovative Veterinary Care Journal

An overview of tear function and why it’s a crucial component of ocular hygiene in your canine and feline patients.

The quality and quantity of tears are vitally important for ocular health. Without them, the eye would not get any oxygen or nutrients, and as with all other living tissues, the corneal cells would die.

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